SC Council for the Social Studies

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From the President

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  • 09 Jul 2017 1:28 PM | Anonymous

    Thinking about running for the Board of the SCCSS?  We encourage you to do so!  

    Please use this link to complete the google form  https://goo.gl/forms/Q14csC332SAO6f342

    If you have questions, please contact either Jennifer Garrick at jgarrick@lexington1.net or Tracy Todd at Tracytodd@pickens.k12.sc.us 

    The deadline to compete the google form is July 22.  We will begin voting on August 2nd and close the vote on September 13th.  

    The positions that are open are for 2 year terms.  Please note that those running must be in good standing with SCCSS and National Council of Social Studies.  We also encourage those running as Representatives of Elementary, Middle and High to have at least 50% of instructional time in the classroom.   


  • 05 Dec 2016 5:05 PM | Anonymous

    This morning, I felt like I was behind from the moment the alarm went off. I had missed two days of school last week to attend the Annual National Conference of Social Studies Conference in Washington, D.C., and now as I entered my classroom, I questioned if the days were worth what I had gained. The answer is a resounding "YES"!

    As my students settled in this morning, I started the class discussing the two tours I had taken while at the conference. The first was to Lincoln's Cottage where he wrote the Emancipation Proclamation and the second was to the National Archives.

    Lincoln's Cottage is a small, sparsely decorated home located on the grounds of the Armed Forces Retirement Home. Lincoln used the cottage as an escape from the craziness of the time. He visited the wounded soldiers (it was a hospital during the Civil War), spent time resting with his wife and sons, and wrote parts of the Emancipation Proclamation on small scraps of paper that were collected by William Slave  to be placed in Lincoln's desk drawer for further review the next day. This idea of Lincoln needing a respite from his daily life and his  interactions with so many people closely involved in the war gave me a deeper understanding of  the background of this beloved president. It also allowed me to discuss the Emancipation Proclamation from a different angle today in class. I felt like I had firsthand knowledge of the document that I have taught annually for the last dozen years  for the first time. My two hours on site made me a better teacher today.

    The National Archives are well-known from the movie National Treasure as it is the scene where the Declaration of Independence is stolen. The building itself houses several interactive exhibits as well as the Declaration, Constitution, and Bill of Rights. The Declaration always makes me a little teary-eyed. The fact that these men were willing to give up their lives, their freedom, and their sacred honors to give us the opportunity to be free. The Declaration itself is incredibly faded. However, four words are still clearly visible - "free and independent states". This is the heart of America. We are free and independent states. I love that! I had a nice discussion about those words with my students today. The Archives currently have an exhibit called "A More Perfect Union". In it, the curators have amassed several interactive stations where visitors can investigate important court cases, moments in history, and lesser known individuals.  The exhibit gave me ideas of court cases to pair up for a stronger APUSH review for my students. It also made me think and remember and focus on why I love what I do so much. This visit also made me a better teacher today because students learn better when you make things come alive which is so much easier when you remember that you LOVE this subject!

    So, you missed your shot at NCSS for this year.  However, you still have a wonderful opportunity to be reminded of why you do what you do and become an even better teacher by attending the rescheduled SCCSS conference in Columbia on February 20th (reception), 21st (Conference), and 22nd (awards breakfast & breakout sessions). The conference will be a wonderful professional development opportunity. You don't want to miss out!

    Registration is open. If you had already registered before the Hurricane forced a reschedule, you do not need to register again. However, you will need to book your room at the Columbia Marriott.

    I look forward to seeing you in February! What you gain by attending will be worth the sub plans. :)

     

  • 04 Oct 2016 2:17 PM | Anonymous

    Please continue to check under 2016 Conference for updates concerning Hurricane Matthew.  Your safety is something we take very serious.  Please be aware and prepared.  Contact me with any questions- 

    lesliecarter80@me.com or 803-240-3313 
    Leslie 

  • 03 Oct 2016 12:44 PM | Anonymous

    Check out the conference program first!!  Go to 2016 Annual Conference and click link to program!  

    This is the link for the inside of the program, the cover is very awesome and will be a big surprise!  Thanks to James Bryan for his efforts on this huge task!  

    Leslie 

  • 13 Sep 2016 11:17 AM | Anonymous

    The National Humanities Center is offering a webinar called, America in Class- Below are some opportunities for you to learn more and get more information about these topics! 

    Investigate the surprising connection between the raw reciprocity between rock and roll and serious literature by Florence Dore (UNC-Chapel Hill) for “A Good Man is Hard to Find” on October 4 . . .


    or the “Landscape of Poetry" with Pulitzer Prize winner Rita Dove (University of Virginia) on January 19 . . .


    or “The Historical Context of Black Lives Matter" with Yohuru Williams (Fairfield University) on Thursday, March 15 . . .


    or the two-part series on the longview history of both sides of the U.S. - Mexican border with “A History the U.S. Border Patrol” with Kelly Hernandez (UCLA) on March 30 and “A History of Violence and Displacement in Mexico” with Elaine Carey (St. John’s) on April 6.


    Teachers can sign up here: http://americaninclass.org/webinars/ http://americainclass.org/webinars/


    Each webinar is 90-minutes long, and free for teachers by using the promo code NHCED.  CEU credit is available upon completion.  Virtual seats are limited, however, so early registration is strongly encouraged.  We also can create a group registration with interested districts or schools.  


    We will be announcing several new projects in the coming months that recruit and assemble humanities educators from across the country to work closely with NHC scholars and staff on curriculum design and innovative technology.  Our goal is to support teacher agency - and to build a strong network community of humanities advocates.


  • 03 Feb 2016 9:46 AM | Anonymous

    Landmarks of American History and Culture - workshops for teachers.

     

    Th​is​ NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture workshop will allow an interdisciplinary group of teachers to enrich their knowledge of the Civil War by learning about ways that collective memories develop and circulate. Workshop participants will study the monuments and significant collections of objects and artifacts housed at cultural institutions throughout the Richmond, Virginia region.

     

    Through the lectures, site visits, discussions, and interacting with primary source materials, teachers will come to understand the complexities of the collective memories of the Civil War, focusing on how collective memory tends to over simplify and present narrow versions of history. We will focus on how collective memories circulate and are represented through historic and artistic means.  

     

    ​The workshops will be the weeks of:

    June 26-July 1

    July 10-July 16​

     

    ​Participants must apply by March 1, 2016 and will be notified by March 31, 2016.  All participants who complete the entire workshop will receive a stipend of $1,200 that ​is intended to help cover the costs of lodging, travel, meals, etc.

     

    ​Please refer to the website for specific information:

    http://legacyofthecivilwar.org/


  • 29 Jan 2016 1:03 PM | Anonymous

    Need a fun activity for this summer! Read below! 

    NEH “Landmarks of American History and Culture” Summer Teacher Workshops

    “Inventing America: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution “

    The Tsongas Industrial History Center invites educators from across the U.S. to Lowell, MA, for “Inventing America: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution,” a week-long summer workshop funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

    The “Inventing America” workshops combine scholarly presentations with on-site investigations of the canals, mills, worker housing, and exhibits of Lowell National Historical Park. In addition to Lowell’s landmark resources, we will use drama, historical fiction, hands-on simulations, and field studies at Old Sturbridge Village, Walden Pond, and Concord, MA, to bring history to life.

    Who: K-12 teachers (public & private), administrators, and school personnel

    When: June 26– July 1; July 17 - 22, 2016 (choose one week)

    Where: Tsongas Industrial History Center, Boott Cotton Mills, Lowell, MA

    Deadline for applications is March 1, 2016

    The Tsongas Center is a partnership of Lowell National Historical Park and UMass Lowell’s Graduate School of Education.

    Housing available at UMass Lowell Inn and Conference Center

    $1,200.00 stipend paid toward expenses.

    CEUs/PDPs and graduate credit available through UMass Lowell.


  • 15 Oct 2015 1:39 PM | Anonymous

    Our programs are designed to reignite your passion for American history and government. Take the content knowledge gained at these programs back to your classroom to inspire your students. Not only will you experience historic sites, like Independence Hall or Monticello, but you will also engage in thoughtful conversation by exploring primary documents with your fellow teachers and a historian/political scientist.

    This spring our colloquia topics will include:

    • America in World War I (Kansas City, MO)
    • Jefferson and Education (Charlottesville, VA)
    • Reagan and the Modern Presidency (Grand Vista, Simi Valley, CA)
    • The American Founding (Philadelphia, PA)
    • LBJ as President: The Vietnam War (Austin, TX)

    For more information regarding these programs, please click here.

    TAH.org also provides program participants with:

    • Reading materials, to be read prior to the program
    • Up to 8 contact hours, with the option to earn 1 graduate credit
    • Hotel accommodations for the weekend (Friday evening through Sunday morning)
    • Complimentary continental breakfast, lunch, dinner, and refreshments during the program
    • A stipend of $225 to help defray the cost of travel to/from the program site

    Are you ready to explore history in the places it was made?

    Apply Now

    The application deadline is Sunday, November 1, 2015.

    We look forward to meeting you at one of our programs. Please direct any questions to our teacher programs team at Info@TAH.org or (419) 289-5411.  



  • 16 Sep 2015 1:44 PM | Anonymous

    Take up the Peace Day Challenge with the U.S. Institute of Peace!

    Ahead of the International Day of Peace, which is marked each year on September 21, the U.S. Institute of Peace has created the Peace Day Challenge. We aim to raise the visibility of this day, to frame peace as an attainable alternative to the violence we see daily in the news, and to encourage individuals and communities across the U.S. and beyond to take an action for peace, to share it at #PeaceDayChallenge, and then to sustain it beyond the day. Learn more, and get involved at www.peacedaychallenge.org! Because Peace is Action, and it starts with You!

     


  • 23 Aug 2015 2:44 PM | Anonymous

    American Presidents Webinar Series


    American Presidents and the challenges they faced will be the focus of TAH.org’s Saturday Webinars for Social Studies Teachers for the 2015-2016 academic year. Drawing from our list of 50 Core Documents, and exploring related sources, TAH.org’s American Presidents webinar series is designed to give teachers a deeper understanding of the issues – domestic and foreign – that each of 10 presidents faced, and how those men handled the challenges of their times.

    For the 2015-16 season, TAH.org has partnered with the National Council for the Social Studies to bring two special, NCSS members-only webinars to teachers. If you’re a current NCSS member, make sure to let us know on the registration page so that you can be part of these two American Presidents webinars, one each semester.

    Our first webinar George Washington: Father of the Country, will be held on Saturday, August 29, 2015 at 11:00 am until 12:15 pm EST. Live webinars will be held each month through May 7, 2016. 


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